David Coggins’ Tips for Avoiding Men’s Fashion Mistakes

There comes a time in everyone’s life when they look at themselves. closet I don’t like what he sees. Staring at him is a bombastic tie, an overly bold shirt, or, Lord, merciful leather pants. there may be something. These clothes seem to have been acquired by another human being who is clearly less tasteful than himself (isn’t that always the case?).

Yes we all made these mistakes. how do they happen? Well, often mistakes start with experimentation, self-confidence, and, dangerously, sartorial enthusiasm. When I got home, the beret had lost its meaning and I no longer enjoyed the glass. Sancerre and Cafe de Flore (I don’t know how hot it looked even while you were there Paris). Moving away from the pinstripe suit might seem a little too raw. Savile Row it is now John Dillinger–esque Halloween costume.

Artistic Life | David Coggins Tailoring Fails

Illustrated by Hillbrand Boss

The intentions may have been good, but context, fit, and trends conspired to leave you humbled. Academy awardsThe rest of us can pray (and Google archive). In short, we’re all too close to the Tailor’s Sun.

in this process digit, I advocated that men take some chances. After all, we want to broaden our horizons. But that doesn’t mean we don’t make mistakes from time to time. For example, jeans deep in a drawer may appear to have been stonewashed over time (I get them out of the house before witnesses get hurt). Here are some tips to avoid common dressing mistakes men make.


Avoid pattern issues.

Tired of solids? i hear youMaybe a loved one pushed you into something a little more interestingWhat you are often left with is just too raw. Neapolitan Tailor. The fabric swatch was a nice oatmeal brown with a nice blue pane. A friend said I looked like a backup dancer. Fred Astaire’s Later color film. it stung. You want to be compared to Fred himself—and in black and white.


Be careful with bold colors.

The furnishings are good. Branching is also good. But going all the way is dangerous. Clothing brands and fashion magazines try to market seasonal looks with “pops” of color. It is often displayed in catalogs and store windows. But we don’t live in advertising campaigns (thankfully). Bright red pants are therefore perfect for Italian men who own models and yachts. Spritz.


Don’t go too tight.

Anything that promises to make you look thinner won’t make you look thinner. It just makes you look uncomfortable. I have pants that I hope don’t tear when I sit down (which is not a good thing!). Either retire from rotation or cut back on beer. fishingClothes that are too small don’t make you look smaller. they make you look bigger.


Wear your age

Trying to dress like a teenager (even teenagers!) will not work. A new rinse for your jeans? sneakers Named after a basketball player your son’s age?


Keep your hobbies secret.

you love golf, fly fishFine, but your outfit doesn’t have to convey these interests with a novelty tie emblazoned with golf balls (I call it the dreaded “Father’s Day tie”). also applies (go vikings!). It doesn’t have to be your team’s brand unless you’re in the stands with a broken heart (also: vikings).


Feel free to follow trends.

Are you at the forefront of the tailoring avant-garde? Tokyo? Then by all means dabble in the latest trends.? The rest of us need to calm things down before we embrace anything thin, wide, cropped or oversized.


There are many styles that take time to get used to. fair isle sweater, tassel loafersherringbone jacket, white backs, velvet dinner jacketThe first time you put them on, it can be a little confusing. But all of these clothes have been successfully worn by generations of men.While getting comfortable, you can rest assured that history is on your side. Sometimes you can never be comfortable and move on. Like me, you may find that white jeans never suit you. A little self-knowledge is always a good thing.

Minnesotans become New Yorkers, David Coggins is the author of new york times best seller men and style writes the style column of artful living.

Read this article published in the magazine.

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